Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
MSNBCW 8
CSPAN2 6
CSPAN 5
MSNBC 4
CNNW 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
and less risky environments. and how to reward those local governments and governments that actually take large responsibilities for mitigating risk, with their business and investment. >> thank you. we have time for just one more question, although i've got probably three hours of questions in front of me. this next one combines three, four cards, questions from the audience, and comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. and this is about -- one part was what happened to poor people who can't afford to own land? and craig, you dealt with this, and margareta also. also, some of these vulnerable areas are also economics where factories and infrastructure, corporations are in these areas. and that's part of what drives people to be there. so there's also and industrial and economic aspect to this. in part of the challenge about helping or not helping is an ethical question, as well as a legal question. so i would like each of you to just address that briefly if you could. >> here's how i would frame it. i've been into me places where i call them the proverbial one c
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
schools didn't want to bring this type of security to their classrooms environment might be benefited by federal financing. they are talking 50 million even more that could be tossed into legislation to actually federally fund protecting kids with armed guards in schools. >> carl cameron, thank you. the time right now 26 after the hour. coming up a landowner takes his case all of the way to the supreme court after the government forces him to sabotage his own property as protective wetlands and then makes him foot the bill. >> image going in for surgery and coming out with the wrong knee replaced. it happens a lot more than you might think. doctors are turning to pilots to help. we will explain. >> it is 30 minutes after the hour. >> it is if i am for the top 5@5:30. >> hagel flip flopping ahead of his confirm may go hearing. he was gensz un l against unilal sanctions in iran. chuck schumer says hagel now believes we must do whatever it takes to stop iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. in the past hagel refused to call hezbollah as a terrorist group but now does. hagel now regrets s
senator schumer said there is still a pretty tense environment here in washington and imm after the inaugural ceremonies up here on the platform, they go inside for the traditional inaugural luncheon where the president, speaker boehner and majority harry reid will be sitting down at the same table and wonder what that environment is like. i asked former bush white house chief of staff andy card about that remembering back to 2001 after that controversial election, and what the environment was there, here is what he told me. >> i suspect it will probably be a lot like the atmosphere that george w. bush experienced in his first term of office, it was a little bit chilly and cold, but at the same time, you can't help, but be wrapped up in the excitement of an inauguration. >> reporter: of course, that's what this really is about. celebrating american democracy on monday, tomorrow, the big question, what will the environment be like on tuesday morning, alisyn. >> alisyn: well, that's absolutely right. there is a lot of environment, john. thanks for showcasing that for us and we ca
owners. it's much harder to get anything done that in marineland or new york, where an urban environment is much more dominant. >> sir, i wanted to get your take on a completely off-topic question here, because some are saying you have inside knowledge about whether or not there will be some political face-changing going on for your home state of kentucky, and actress ashley judd's potential bid for u.s. senate. you told the wdrv news that i think she's very interested in becoming a candidate for some office. whether. i don't know, but she's a very serious potential candidate. what makes you believe she is a very serious potential candidate? >> well, first of all, she has been engaged in public policy questions for a number of years. i've been on programs with her, for instance, in opposition to mountaintop removal mining. she's got a public policy degree from harvard. this is somebody who has always been very, very involved in issues and very interested in politics, and she sees an opportunity to make a difference now. she's got a long career ahead of her. i think acting may have lost a
don't know. you can't ignore the complex interplay between biology and environment when it comes to this illness. >> what about the ethnic factor? we always talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it lack of tolerance? what's the terms? is there a term for it? is there legacy? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and there's an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, preen. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it with the use of experimentation of marijuana, drugs, you're -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana. >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to be -- weigh in here because we already know what the liquor industry and the tobacco industry have done to our country in targeting kids. and so we need to be mindful and not rush into this -- >> like joe camel, that kind of stuff. >> exactly. joe camel. liquor stores are in places where you know that there are people who are going to abuse liquor and
environment, the world aids crisis, the world arms race -- they affect us all. today, as an older order passes, the new world is more free but less stable. communism's collapse has called forth old animosities and new dangers. clearly, america must continue to lead the world we did so much to make. while america rebuilds at home, we will not shrink from the challenges nor fail to seize the opportunities of this new world. together with our friends and allies, we will work to shape change, lest it engulf us. when our vital interests are challenged or the will and conscience of the international community is defied, we will act, with peaceful diplomacy whenever possible, with force when necessary. the brave americans serving our nation today in the persian gulf, in somalia, and wherever else they stand are testament to our resolve. but our greatest strength is the power of our ideas, which are still new in many lands. across the world we see them embraced, and we rejoice. our hopes, our hearts, our hands are with those on every continent who are building democracy and freedom. their cause is ame
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
labor, but for the environment, green jobs, women's rights. >> thank you. >> the lot. hilda, what about immigration reform and what it would mean to the treasury. how many more americans, how many more people would we get on the rolls on paying taxes in this country if it were done properly? >> well, if people were thinking rationally, we would look at putting money back into our treasury and the social security fund, in the medicare and medicaid fund, because people would be brought out of the shadows. you're talking about billions of dollars. in fact, what the president has done right now by allowing individuals from deferred action, the dreamers, to be able to be a part of our system here, they're going to be contributors. they're going to have a work permit. they're going to be able to contribute to us that money will go into our treasury. they will be abiding citizens, citizens, potential citizens. but more importantly what will happen for those many 12 million and others. they're not all latino, by the way. they come from different countries. >> yeah. >> so let's talk than. let's
't ignore the interplay between biology and environment. >> what about the fact that we talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it a lack of tolerance? is there a term for it? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, prevention. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it, you're permanently -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana? >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to weigh in here. so we need to be mindful, and not jump into this. >> like joe camel and that kind of stuff. >> exactly. liquor stores. liquor stores are places where people are going to abuse liquor and have easy access. >> this is too hot. the hottest topic in this country right now is gun safety. your family has been victimized. because of your family being victims, we are all victims. what is your feeling? >> it's not just the person that's killed, like my uncles. it's the whole family. so my father surv
something very different. the individual if you would have taught that in a classroom environment adjust a discussion on -- [inaudible] that's very important dynamic there. >> game changer, shell gas, more regulation, barrier, culture. i want to talk about the here mowns. [laughter] mcken city is about the cutting age looking at not only global manufacturing trends but trends you're describing advanced industry. and innovation. how do you see it? >> i think very much is said at the beginning of the context claus. there's a shift doing on. i think we should start by saying too many of us lump manufacturing in to one big category. i think there are at least five categories. i won't bore with them. i think the tip is the advanced manufacturing which is more using big data. it's advanced material. it's nano technology. it's the combination of many of the things the innovation capabilities that this country is good at the cross functional capability. as you said, it's -- it's roughly around 11 to 12% of gdp. it's extremely important fly wheel. it accounts, football we think, a third of the u.
that schools are structured environment and frankly, little girl's behavior, a willingness to sit still, pay attention, not necessarily to talk and get up and run around the room is more conducive to a classroom setting. what we've done, trying to turn little boys into different forms of little girls and a lot has to do with the way that schools are structured. you take a six-year-old and sit him in a chair and expect that they're going to stay there. it isn't natural, frankly, it isn't natural for a lot of little girls, it's more for the convenience of teachers than it is accommodating to the child's needs. >> that's truly right. little boys are savages, i don't mean that in-- it's just true. >> we can't change it, but thr he' lovable and grow up to warm, wonderful human beings when they get a little older. >> tucker: amen. on that hopeful note. coming up, get an instant mood boost from botox. true, that story coming up and women all around put it on every day, but one woman gave herself a no makeup challenge for a year, claims it made her more beautiful. is this a good lesson in vanity for
regulated environment. so we take you quickly through a few studies that we've done that i think shows some very consistent patterns with firearms selzer accountability measures and the diversion of guns to criminals. the first one we published in 2009 was a study where we took the atf data from the 54 cities that had done comprehensive trace practices, had been in place in those cities. we looked at the state gun laws and we did a survey of state and local agencies to see what practices they engaged with respect to the oversight of licensed gun dealers and we did some regression analysis we control for a number of factors including other state done laws, gun ownership proxy's and the proximity to other states with weak gun laws. what we found is when you just looked at the states having strong gun dealer registrations by itself, it actually did not affect the diversion of guns to criminals. it was only having those in concert with a practicing those agencies of regulatory audit inspections and oversight of the dealers which i think it's quite interesting and important. we also found states
are very important to try to create this environment is most appropriate. that is what we are doing. there are potential risks and inflation was mentioned. we have obviously used an expansionary monetary policy and we have increased the amount of reserves that banks hold with the bad. there are some people that think that that will be inflationary. personally i don't see much evidence of that. inflation, as i mentioned, has been quite low. expectations remain anchored. private sector forecasters do not seek any inflation coming up, and in particular, we have, i believe, with all the tools that we need to undo our monetary policy stimulus and to take that away for inflation becomes a problem. so i do not believe that you can inflation is going to be a result of any of us. that being said i stability -- in terms of stability, it is well maintained. the other thing worth mentioning is financial ability. this is a difficult issue. the concern has been raised by keeping interest rates very low that the federal reserve induces people to take greater risks in their financial investments, a
interest level in this environment. you have to wonder if the bank isn't holding on to your loan to maintain that high level of interest. i wonder if the might be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstances to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all the bad loans that day made during the real estate mania. host: this idea of the debt to income ratio. that was something richard cordray talked-about. this is from american hero joe. explain this issue for us. guest: this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan. we do not want people taking on loans that they cannot afford to repay. 43% is the outside level. if your mortgage debt sure other debt -- car loans, credit cards -- exceed 43% of your growth or pre-tax income, then that is too much. that is a loan that is becoming too onerous and you might have trouble repaying. anything below 43% is acceptable as a qualified mortgage. anything above that starts to get into the territory of you are not having enough
30 days to create that political environment, that it's going to make it, you know, better for members who are tempted to vote for some of these measures to actually follow through and do it. >> what do you make of some of these folks? some of these folks who are saying there's a growing concern that the president and congress are trying to rewrite the second amendment and that they are trying to take guns away from people? >> you know, again, i come from a relatively rural part of connecticut, and, you know, there are a lot of gun owners in my opinion, we've already been talking to with e-mails and calls, and who do -- are willing to support measures like local background checks so people with criminal records are prevented from buying weapons. if you look at supreme court decisions, hellor versus d.c., that set for the the strong interpretation of the second amendment as an individual right, even within the context of that ruling justice scalia says society has the right to restrict ownership for people with mental illness and criminal records and guns that fall into the
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
, of states has been severely injured. we need to repair that damage. now, within the interior and environment appropriations there's money for wastewater and sewer treatment projects, things that haven to be done -- have to be done. we have to provide that money. i think we have about a billion and a half dollars to do that. certainly if we september the rogers-frelinghuysen -- if we accept the rogers-frelinghuysen amendment. and this bill is whole with that amendment which we should strongly support. there's an amendment to require -- to take away mr. frelinghuysen's effort to allow a waiver on historic preservation. well, yes, it should be done. these localities don't have that kind of money. and a lot of the revenue coming into these economies is coming from tourism. they come to see historic structures. they come to see the way that many parts of the northeast were. when we were building the foundation of this country. that money should be made available in whole with federal dollars. mr. frelinghuysen's amendment is right on point. it needs to be included. so i know i'm getting to -- i'v
and it just -- being in the environment, it made me, you know, want to be more involved in the other aspects of my physical health. >> that's when you started getting into working out. is this book for mere mortals? we joke about it. we see you at "in the club." our results may very. you're pretty in shape. >> when they call me machine they're making fun of me. >> oh, they are? >> yes. the book is for the average person to -- person that's a little more advanced. there's two different programs in there. it's a six-week program. it has diet involved in it. a lot of times people get the training right and not implement the right diet and so they don't see the results they're actually looking for. >> a lot of people have notions about the rap lifestyle. not everyone immediately thinks this is the healthiest lifestyle. something you take on right away in the book. you write you might legitimately ask, who are you to preach fitness? aren't you the guy who dropped joints like high all the time? >> comfortable with that fitness and everything else i wrote in the album, all the dysfunctional behavio
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)